An Updated Intro To Rational Job Hunting Products

Use logical keywords for search and filtering Hiring managers typically have filters and folders set up to manage their email and probably won’t focus on your message when they first see it, saysLeonov. interview body languageThat’s why it’s important to include keywords like “job application” or “job candidate” that will make the email searchable later. List your designations to show that you’re qualified The subject line should be a place to distinguish yourself and immediately catch a recruiter’s eye. If it would be easily understood by the recruiter, Augustine recommends including any acronyms you have that are pertinent to the job. For example, you might add MBA, CPA, or Ph.D. after your name, depending on its relevancy to the position. If someone referred you, be sure to use their name If you’ve been referred by a mutual acquaintance, do not save that for the body of the email, says Augustine. Put it in the subject line to grab the hiring manager’s attention right away. Moreover, she suggests beginning the subject line with the person’s full name.For example, Friend of Jane Doe, interested in analyst position. Create some curiosity In a LinkedIn article , Adam Grant, a Wharton professor and organizational psychologist, points to research that shows people are more likely to read emails with subject lines that create curiosity or provide utility. If you’re feeling brave, you might try a subject line like, “9 reasons you should move forward with Janeas your new salesmanager.” It creates curiosity while also including the important details.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-write-the-perfect-email-subject-line-for-job-hunting-2016-9?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=referral

In this case, the team went hunting for extended extreme precipitation events using three-day totals. They widened their search from southern Louisiana to include the rest of the US Gulf Coast to avoid, figuratively, missing changes in the forest for focusing on one tree. Intense precipitation here can come from several different types of weather systems, which makes this a little tricky. There are tropical low pressure systems, but also fronts when the jet stream dips far enough south, and other conditions that cause moist surface air to rise and cool. The researchers analyzed simulations from two climate models that run with exceptionally fine spatial resolution, as those do a better job with this kind of weather. They looked at simulations run with climate forcings like CO2 and solar activity matching the historical changes since 1860, as well as baseline simulations with forcings permanently stuck in 1860 (or another year). If you pick any individual weather station, the probability of experiencing an extreme event like the one southern Louisiana saw a few weeks ago in a given year is in the neighborhood of 1-in-550. The probability of seeing an event like that somewhere in the Gulf Coast region in a given year comes down to about 1-in-30. But all of the weather station data show that these probabilities are increasing over time as extreme events have gotten stronger. According to the model simulations, thats what we would expect to see in the region as the climate warms. They show that a rainfall event like the recent one is at least 1.4 times as likely (and probably closer to double) as it was in 1860. That means a 100-year rain event drops to at least a 70-year eventwith a new, stronger 100-year event taking its place.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/09/was-august-deluge-in-louisiana-worsened-by-climate-change/

job hunting

job hunting